home page

Dr John Worthington

Educational and Developmental Psychologist

Brisbane Australia

Publications and conference presentations

  1. Worthington, J. (2016, October 5). Early Literacy Development: Reality and Perceptions., MindChamps 2016, Singapore. (Power Point Presentation).
  2. Worthington, J. (2016, May). Understanding the Educational, Cognitive & Learning Needs Of Gifted & Talented Persons with Autism., Autism Exposed Singapore 2016. (Power Point Presentation).
  3. Worthington, J. (2016, May 6). Understanding and Implementing Positive Behaviour Management for Children with Autism. Presented at Singapore Association of OT (SAOT) paediatric special interest group. (Power Point Presentation).
  4. Worthington, J. (2004, September). Interpreting Psycho-Educational Reports. Presented at SPELD, Brisbane, Australia. (Power Point Presentation).
  5. Worthington, J. (2002, March). Perceptions of Young Children's Learning and Computer Use. Discussion Seminar presented at The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia. (Power Point Presentation).
  6. Worthington, J. (2001, July). The parent, the teacher and the tests: Clinical implications of a longitudinal study of the perceptions of early-literacy development. Paper presented at the Partnerships Educational Psychology Conference, Brisbane, Australia. (see abstract below or Power Point Presentation 190kbytes).
  7. Worthington, J. (1999). Early literacy: The evolution and relevance of parental perceptions and predictions. In P. Westwood, & W. Scott (Eds.), Learning disabilities advocacy and action. Melbourne: Australian Resource Educators' Association.
  8. Worthington, J. (1997, October). School difficulties: Guidance officer and teacher expectations. Paper presented at the Paediatric Society of Queensland & Australian College of Paediatrics, Queensland Branch, Sunshine Coast, Queensland.
  9. Worthington, J. (1997). All children must learn to read and write; current trends in the understanding of literacy development. Is what you see what you get? Paper presented at The Sunshine Coast Paediatric Association; 1 May 1997 at Nambour Hospital
  10. Worthington, J. (1999). Early literacy: The evolution and relevance of parental perceptions and predictions, Griffith University School of Human Services; 4 October 1999
  11. Worthington, J. (1998). An overview of educational testing of young adults and adults. Presentation for Commonwealth Rehabilitation Service Logan (CRS).
  12. Worthington, J. (1998). A question of repeating. Education Queensland, New Farm State School.
  13. Worthington, J. (1999). The evolution of the Developmental learning Profile (DLP), its relationship to the digital portfolio and its uses in assessment and research.
  14. EQ worker explores early literacy. Education Queensland, Education Views, 26 November 1999 (p. 13).

Abstract:

Worthington, J. (2001, July). The parent, the teacher and the tests: Clinical implications of a longitudinal study of the perceptions of early-literacy development. Paper presented at the Partnerships Educational Psychology Conference, Brisbane, Australia.

High levels of literacy are considered as a positive indicator of the social and economic well being of a western style society. Being literate is widely considered the key indicator of success for the individual in the education system, and not surprisingly parents believe literacy skills are the key reason why children go to school. In the past decade education systems throughout Australia and in many other countries have introduced universal screening to identify children in need, yet the literature suggests that both parents and teachers can make relatively accurate judgments about a wide range of issues surrounding children's literacy and learning. It has also been proposed that parents and teachers exercise their judgments about literacy differently, teachers focus on the child achieving their personal best while parents focus more on literacy skills as a means of independence and self reliance.

This presentation highlights the outcomes of one part of a longitudinal study undertaken in a range of government and private school and focused on the differences and similarities observed when the perceptions of parents and teachers were compared and the relationships these changing perceptions had to standardized assessment results. The study examined in detail the early literacy experiences of one child in each of 30, with a focus on 8 children. The study spanned four years of development from the start of preschool to end of Year 3. The differences between group results and those of individual children will be considered and presented and considered as theoretical models. The final part of the presentation will consider the implications of the data for the clinician undertaking individual case-work. It will be proposed that how parents perceive and report on their child's early literacy provides a potent and relevant view of the child which clinicians need to understand and utilize.